Master of Defence Studies

Contacts

Department Head
Dr. Eric Ouellet
Programme Chair
Dr. Walter Dorn
Telephone
Head: 416-482-6800 ext. 6795
Chair: 416-482-6800 ext. 6358
Fax
416-482-6802
Email
Head: ouellet@cfc.dnd.ca
Chair: dorn@cfc.dnd.ca

Course Descriptions

General Information

Note

The Department of Defence Studies is a department of the Faculty of Arts that is located at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto, Ontario.

Options

The Department offers courses in defence studies that are either specifically designed for the degree Master of Defence Studies (MDS) or fall within the framework of the MA in War Studies MA(WS) and Master of Public Administration (MPA) degrees, depending on which professional military education programme an individual is undertaking at the Canadian Forces College.

The degree Master of Defence Studies (MDS) is offered to students of the Joint Command and Staff Programme (JCSP) concurrently with the JCSP. It is a professional one-year Master's Degree awarded by the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) and approved by the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies.

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) is potentially offered to students of the National Security Programme (NSP). The programme leads to a Master of Public Administration awarded by the Royal Military College of Canada and approved by the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies.

Master of Defence Studies

The degree Master of Defence Studies investigates the relationships between the Profession of Arms and National Security policies. It includes military command, leadership and the conduct of major military operations and strategy including war fighting, peace support operations, and domestic operations for national security. The management of defence resources is also encompassed within defence studies. The degree covers both applied and theoretical topics. Since defence studies are inherently interdisciplinary, it draws upon defence management, economics, history, human resources management, international relations, peace studies, sociology, anthropology, strategic and security studies, warfare studies, and other academic disciplines. The degree is generally limited to competitively selected members of the profession, according to nationally and internationally recognized standards of professional competence.

Defence Studies (DS) credits may be acceptable toward other graduate programmes. Check each programme's section in the calendar.

Admission

Individuals admitted to the Canadian Forces College through professional selection are deemed to be students of RMC, and their work is assessed as part of a graduate programme. Graduate level Defence Studies courses are an integral aspect of professional programmes of study designed for both the third and fourth development periods (DP3 and DP4) for Canadian officers. All Defence Studies courses are offered at the Canadian Forces College as components of the Joint Command and Staff Programme (JCSP) and the National Security Programme (NSP).

Students wishing to read for the MDS degree along with the JCSP or the MPA degrees along with the NSP must apply for admission to RMCC in accordance with the procedures outlined in the general regulations defined in the RMCC Graduate Studies Calendar. Students applying to these graduate programmes will normally require an Honours (four year) Bachelor's degree in Arts, Science or Engineering, or an equivalent from a recognized university with at least a "B" average (73% or better) standing in the last year.

The JCSP and NSP programmes are only available to military officers competitively selected for attendance or to civilians selected by their employer for attendance.

Information for Non JCSP students seeking details regarding admission to the Royal Military College as a graduate student can be found in the Admissions section of this Calendar

JCSP and NSP students will be briefed on their respective degree programmes at CFC.

Programme Requirements

Master of Defence Studies

The degree of Master of Defence Studies will be awarded to JCSP students who successfully complete a programme of studies comprised of either of the following patterns:

  • Course Pattern (ten graduate credits)
  • Directed Research Project Pattern (eight graduate credits plus a two credit directed research project)

All students are required to complete seven common graduate credits:

  • DS540: Domestic and Expeditionary Operations
  • DS544: Basic Joint Operational Planning
  • DS545: Component Capabilities
  • DS555: Leadership
  • DS556 Command
  • DS569: International Security and Canadian Foreign Policy

In addition to the seven common graduate credits, those in the Course Pattern are also required to complete three graduate credits, comprised of two one-credit courses selected from one of the following groups:

  • DS548: Advanced Joint Warfighting and DS549 Advanced Topics in Campaign Design; or
  • DS557: Institutional Policy Analysis and DS554 Advanced Topics in Institutional Policy Development; or
  • DS567: Global Power and Institutions and DS568 Advanced Topics in International Security Studies

And one of:

  • DS534: Operational & Strategic Command Analysis
  • DS535: Global Politics, Culture, and Conflict
  • DS536: Case Studies in Canadian International Policy
  • DS537: Captors and Captives
  • DS538: Genocide, Conflict, and Justice
  • DS539: Intelligence Studies: Historical, Theoretical, and Contemporary Dimensions
  • DS543: War and Society
  • Various War Studies and other Programme courses taken with permission of the Chair MDS.

In addition to the seven common graduate credits, those in the Directed Research Pattern are required to complete:

One of:

  • DS534: Operational & Strategic Command Analysis
  • DS535: Global Politics, Culture, and Conflict
  • DS536: Case Studies in Canadian International Policy
  • DS537: Captors and Captives
  • DS538: Genocide, Conflict, and Justice
  • DS539: Intelligence Studies: Historical, Theoretical, and Contemporary Dimensions
  • DS543: War and Society
  • DS548: Advanced Joint Warfighting
  • DS557: Institutional Policy Analysis
  • DS567: Global Power and Institutions
  • Various War Studies (WS) and other Programme courses taken with permission of the Chair MDS

And:

  • PR500: Directed Research Project

Non Degree Courses

JCSP students who are not admitted to the MDS at the start of JCSP will take two non-credit courses to satisfy the professional military education requirements of JCSP. These courses are not eligible for any full or partial graduate course credit nor do these courses appear on RMCC transcripts. Those who apply for MDS admission subsequent to commencing JCSP studies will be required to complete a minimum of two additional graduate credits.

JCSP and NSP Programme Descriptions

Joint Command and Staff Programme

The Joint Command and Staff Programme (JCSP) is for mid-level leaders and managers, available in two learning streams, both of which include the option of reading for a Master of Defence Studies, and designed to extend the knowledge base required by professional officers. It is intended primarily for Majors and Lieutenant-Commanders, and seeks to provide officers with the analytical and interpretive skills necessary for military success and quality leadership of the Canadian Forces. Students on the JCSP are competitively selected from amongst their peers, in accordance with exacting professional criteria. The curriculum emphasizes command and leadership, ethics, military operations across the spectrum of conflict, operational art, understanding of national security, defence management, and professional officership skills developed through individual and collective learning on common and elective courses as listed under Programme Requirements.

National Security Programme

The National Security Programme (NSP) is a ten-month residential programme, which offers courses designed to prepare senior officers at the Colonel and Captain (N) rank level or civilian equivalent for demanding command and leadership positions in a global environment. Students are competitively selected in accordance with professional standards and potential for advancement. The curriculum emphasizes strategic leadership, strategic management and war fighting in joint and combined operations at the operational and strategic levels. The nature of the modern military profession makes international standards for the conduct of operations an essential element of each course.

The professional NSP core courses are:

  • DS571: Canada in the Global Strategic Environment
  • DS572: Canadian Governance in Comparative Context
  • DS581: Executive Leadership
  • DS582: Strategic Resource Management
  • DS591: The Theory and Practice of High Command
  • DS592: Comprehensive Operations
  • DS597: Contemporary Security Studies

In addition to the cores courses listed above, there are a number of electives that may be taken in conjunction with the NSP core courses. This may include NSP elective defence studies courses, core MPA courses to meet degree requirements and elective MPA courses. the optional courses that could be offered are as follows:

  • DS584: The Role of Culture in Whole-of-Government Approaches
  • DS594: Strategic Art

Additional Defence Studies Credits

Students requiring additional DS courses to complete the requirements for the MDS are invited to register for the following courses related to their professional duties, under appropriate supervision assigned by the Department of Defence Studies.

The following courses may be available by arrangement with faculty of the Department of Defence Studies.

  • DS501: Analysis of Contemporary Conflict
  • DS503: Field Research on Contemporary Conflict
  • DS505: Analysis of Defence Headquarters Issues
  • DS507: Field Research on Defence Headquarters Issues
  • DS509: Analysis of Doctrinal Questions
  • DS511: Empirical Research on Doctrinal Questions
  • DS513: Special Topics: Readings In Security Studies
  • DS515: Independent Study
  • DS519: Military Law in Comparative perspective

Course Descriptions

DS501 Analysis of Contemporary Conflict

Students learn techniques for conflict analysis from a reading package and apply those techniques to analyze a recent or contemporary conflict drawing on primary and secondary sources. Students provide an assessment and critique of the utility of various analytical tools for the purposes of the research problem they have chosen.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS503 Field Research on Contemporary Conflict

Drawing on primary and secondary sources, students map a conflict and identify researchable questions, consider ethical and safety issues, and deploy for a period of field research using Rapid Assessment Procedure (RAP) or a comparable technique. Research involving human subjects requires prior approval by a university Research Ethics Board. Supervisors may request evidence of competence in analytical techniques before permitting the field research to proceed.

Corequisite:
DS501: Analysis of Contemporary Conflict, is recommended as a companion course.
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS505 Analysis of Defence Headquarters Issues

Students survey from a reading package analytical techniques drawing on various disciplines (organizational psychology, sociology, anthropology, and management science) appropriate to research in a complex headquarters environment. They then apply an appropriate technique to the study of a professional problem within a defence headquarters or similar organization. Students provide an assessment and critique of the utility of various analytical tools for the purposes of the research problem they have chosen.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS507 Field Research on Defence Headquarters Issues

Drawing on primary and secondary sources, students identify researchable questions related to the functioning of a headquarters or staff organization, consider ethical and safety issues, and deploy for a period of research in the organization using an appropriate research technique. Research involving human subjects requires prior approval by a university Research Ethics Board and notification of the appropriate supervisors (including DHRRE). Supervisors may request evidence of competence in analytical techniques before permitting the research to proceed.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS509 Analysis of Doctrinal Questions

Students survey historical debates on questions of military or related security doctrine from a study package, and identify techniques for analysis and resolution of doctrinal differences. They then apply appropriate techniques to the analysis of a recent or evolving doctrinal debate. Students provide an assessment and critique of the utility of various analytical tools for the purposes of the research problem they have chosen.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS511 Empirical Research on Doctrinal Questions

Drawing on primary and secondary sources, students identify a question of military or security doctrine for which there is expected to be an empirical answer. They identify research and analytical techniques that will yield empirical data from which to answer the doctrinal question. These may include gaming, simulation, field experimentation, observation, or case comparison. Research involving human subjects requires prior approval by a university Research Ethics Board and notification of the appropriate supervisors (including DHRRE). Supervisors may request evidence of competence in analytical techniques before permitting the research to proceed.

Corequisite:
DS509 Analysis of Doctrinal Questions, is recommended as a companion course.
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS513 Special Topics: Readings In Security Studies

This course offers students the opportunity to examine selected topics in the various fields of security studies. The emphasis will be on security and defence with particular attention to Canada and North America. In any one year, topics chosen will include some of the following: defence analysis and policy making; intelligence and national security; evolution of strategic thought; the privatization of security and the role of non-state actors; homeland security; human security; science, technology and security; terrorism and counter-terrorism; environmental security. Students are welcome to suggest areas of personal interest. Course work includes a research paper of graduate seminar quality and/or presentations.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS515 Independent Study

This course provides an opportunity for students to design and execute an independent research project on a question that interests them in the general area of defence studies that is not covered by an existing course at CFC. Normally, this course is conducted as a directed studies course (i.e. reading course) and involves individual research under the direction of the instructor and the submission of a research paper of graduate seminar quality. Only one independent study can be taken for credit towards a single degree. All independent study proposals must be approved by the Head of the Department of Defence Studies. Before approval is granted, students must have sought out and gained the support of a faculty member with the relevant expertise, agreed with that expert on an appropriate plan of study, finalized a topic and question for research, and established a legitimate procedure for assessment.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS519 Military Law in Comparative Perspective

Military law in Canada has evolved historically, legally, and organizationally to meet the specific needs of the Canadian Forces and reflect broader changes in Canadian society. This course examines the state of Canadian military law from the past to the present day, with particular emphasis on the balance between operational requirements and the primacy of civilian control in a parliamentary democracy.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS526 Peace and Stability Operations: An Evolving Practice

This course explores the field operations deployed to conflict areas to mitigate or end violence and to help rebuild war-torn societies. Peace or peacekeeping operations have evolved consider- ably with new and expanded mandates and more robust mechanisms for international military police and civilians. The course will compare the concepts and experiences of UN, NATO, and regional organizations in such operations. Successes and failures will be reviewed, and case studies will help get the "sense on the ground".

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS534 Operational & Strategic Command Analysis

This course provides a solid foundation in analyzing various challenges to military decision-making at the operational and strategic levels. The organizational, institutional, and societal dimensions of military decision-making are the main focus and are introduced through various historical and contemporary case studies. The case studies examine issues such as the impact of conventional mindsets in irregular warfare conflicts, the role of ideology and cognitive predispositions in military decision-making, institutional limits to military transformation, and resolving incompatibilities between political and military objectives.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS535 Global Politics, Culture, and Conflict

The role of culture in international relations is a theme that is worthy of being studied and taught due to its sensitive quality and the confusion associated with it. In fact, since the end of the Cold War, successive attempts were made to account for these relations from an academic perspective. From the controversial thesis of the clash of civilizations to the more nuanced constructivist contributions, the first module of this course will provide us with the opportunity to review the overall majority of these theoretical attempts. The second module seeks to look at a series of geocultural sets which are a priori separate, such as the West, the Arab-Moslem world, China, etc., in order to test the cultural hypothesis according to which cultural identity determines the behaviour of states. The ultimate goal of this course consists of developing a critical approach that lends itself to demonstrating the complexity of the main issue pertaining to the subject matter, as well as outlining the limitations of cultural determinism.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS536 Case Studies in Canadian International Policy

This course is designed to introduce participants to the study of Canada's international policy. It uses history as a lens to assess contemporary issues and struggles. The early sessions of the course use historical case studies to facilitate the discussion and analysis of issues brought up in the weekly readings as well as to explore linkages between previous Canadian experiences with contemporary international policy themes. Towards the end of the course, participants research, design, and present their own contemporary cases. To understand the context of the international policy decisions taken in Canada, this course considers both the domestic situation and politics abroad, with specific reference to the policies of Canada's most significant allies.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS537 Captors and Captives

This elective compares British, Canadian and Japanese captivity experiences, with emphasis on military, leadership, cultural, and legal dimensions. Historical illustrations highlight timeless dilemmas useful to understanding past and contemporary operations. Conduct will be through film, first-hand memoirs, prominent fictional works, case studies, and seminars.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS538 Genocide, Conflict, and Justice

This elective course provides students with interdisciplinary intellectual frameworks for understanding and analyzing the numerous, complex, and often emotional issues related to genocide, including legal, political, historical, psychological, and sociological debates surrounding the definition, causes, and processes of genocide specifically and mass atrocity more generally. An examination of several major cases of genocide will provide the foundation for a comprehensive analysis that emphasizes both international and national dynamics, and especially 1) the historical intersections of changing international relations, great power politics, development, modernity, and the interstate/ intrastate armed conflict; and 2) the relationship between ethnic inequality and violence, and the impact of nationalist population policies. Along with case studies, more general themes will be analyzed, namely the shifting roles of perpetrators, bystanders, witnesses and victims, emerging responses of the international community with respect to genocide prevention such as the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), existing domestic, international, and international criminal law, and the use of courts, tribunals, and alternative forms of justice in punishment and reconciliation, as well as lingering questions of historical/collective memory and genocide denial.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS539 Intelligence Studies: Historical, Theoretical, and Contemporary Dimensions

This course will address intelligence from the perspectives of history, theory, and current debates. It will assess the differing types of intelligence, and the differing ways in which intelligence is utilized, including the organizational entities responsible for intelligence. Although the general international context will be examined, particular emphasis will be placed upon the Canadian experience with intelligence in both military and civilian applications. It will conclude by examining current issues in intelligence in the contemporary security environment.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS540 Domestic and Expeditionary Operations

This course develops the advanced knowledge and skills for the planning and conduct of joint and combined operations across the spectrum of conflict at the operational level. The course is divided into three modules. The first module examines domestic operations, including a study of domestic threats. The second module examines expeditionary operations, involving a study of stability, peace support, and counter-insurgency operations. It includes consideration of the joint and multinational military forces available to the joint force commander to achieve effects across the spectrum of conflict, as well as the coordination required with Other Government Departments (OGD) and non-government organizations. The third module looks as issues of joint command and control and consideration of OGDs involved in domestic, continental and joint operations. Assessment is through student participation and two practical exercises.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS541 Leadership and Ethics

The course uses lectures, practical exercises, case studies, and small group discussions to explore leadership theory, professional ethics, cultural complexity, the profession of arms, critical thinking, and problem solving to enhance students' leadership effectiveness. Participants apply decision-making tools to resolve leadership scenarios, and subject matter experts provide evaluation and feedback based on experience and published research. Assessment is by participation in seminars and discussions, practical exercises and simulation and written essays.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS542 Command and Management

The course uses lectures, practical exercises, case studies, and small group discussions to explore the theory of command, the command environment, principle-based decision making including negotiating and alternative perspectives, law of armed conflict, and Canadian Defence Management to enhance students' overall capacity to command. Participants apply decision-making tools to resolve command challenges, and subject matter experts provide evaluation and feedback based on experience and published research. Assessment is by participation in seminars and discussions, practical exercises and simulation and a written essay.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS543 War and Society

This course examines the shifts in the practise of warfare as a product of society. Topics to be addressed are Warfare and the Ancients, Early and Late Industrialism, Emergence of Operational Art and Into the Future - Informationalism. Assessment is by a participation in seminars and discussions, practical exercises and simulation and a written essay.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS544 Basic Joint Operational Planning

This course develops the basic knowledge and skills essential for the planning and conduct of joint and combined operations at the operational level. The first module consists of practical exercises during which students work in teams to produce operational designs and Concept of Operations (CONOP) documents for operations in the contemporary operating environment. The second module examines the significance of the operational functions in the conduct of contemporary warfare. Assessment is by oral presentations, synopses, tutorials and a course confirmatory exam.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS545 Component Capabilities

This course focuses on the functions and fundamentals of the Maritime, Land, Aerospace and Special Operations components which form the combat power in joint and combined operations. Study will look at the historic development of each of the CF components, their characteristics and finally their role in joint and combined operations. Assessment is by oral presentations, case studies and course confirmatory activities involving five written synopses.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS546 Advanced Joint Operational Planning

This course develops the advanced knowledge and skills for the planning and conduct of joint and combined operations across the spectrum of conflict at the operational level. The first module examines domestic operations, including a study of counter-terrorism and consideration of other governmental departments involved in domestic and continental operations. The second examines expeditionary operations, involving a study of stability, peace support and counter-insurgency operations. It includes consideration of the joint and multinational military forces available to a joint force commander to achieve effects across the spectrum of conflict, as well as the coordination required with other government departments and non-government organizations. The third module involves practical exercises requiring the students to work in teams to produce the Concept of Operations (CONOP) documents for domestic operations and expeditionary operations. Assessment is by oral presentations, case studies and a course confirmatory activity involving two practical exercises.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (two terms)
Credit(s):
2

DS547 National Security and International Affairs

This course analyzes domestic and international factors that affect Canada and influence its policies. The first module provides the theoretical foundations for analyzing and understanding state power, strategic studies and international relations. Later modules focus on the socio-cultural factors, institutional processes, values, interests and issues that influence Canadian strategic decision making; Canada's relationship with the United States; and Canada's role in various international organizations and the global power environment within which Canadian policies are shaped and implemented. Assessment is by presentations, participation in seminars, discussions and a written essay.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS548 Advanced Joint Warfighting

This course develops the advanced concepts, knowledge, and skills essential for the planning and conduct of joint and combined operations at the operational level in the context of the application of campaign planning for domestic and expeditionary operations. It builds upon the theory and background of each component and joint military planning concepts to introduce a wider variety of approaches to operational planning.

Prerequisites:
DS540, DS544, DS545
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS549 Advanced Topics in Campaign Design

This course introduces a range of more specialized topics related to the broad domain of campaign design and the conduct of joint and combined operations at the operational level for domestic and expeditionary operations. These topics (such as but not limited to: irregular warfare, targeting, and the cyber domain) will provide further depth to an appreciation of joint and combined operations. Assessment will be through seminar participation and a major independent research paper addressing a topic of the student's choice.

Prerequisites:
DS540, DS544, DS545
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS554 Advanced Topics in Institutional Policy Development

This course provides focused consideration of specific topics in policy development with a particular view on the interactions between the military institution and its parent society. Using a case study methodology, consideration will be given to how policies may be developed which effectively address often conflicting requirements arising from: government direction, societal expectations, and military professional perspectives. Topics to be addressed will focus on the development and implementation of various institutional policies such as the integration of women and minorities in the armed forces, the impact of new technologies on command culture and military capabilities, and the recruiting and integration challenges posed by the millennial generation. Assessment will be through seminar participation and a major independent research paper addressing a topic of the student's choice.

Prerequisites:
DS555
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS555 Leadership

The course uses lectures, practical exercises, case studies, and small group discussions to explore leadership theory, cultural complexity, the profession of arms, critical thinking, and problem solving to enhance students' leadership effectiveness. Participants apply decision-making tools to resolve leadership scenarios, and subject matter experts provide evaluation and feedback based on experience and published research. Assessment is by participation in seminars and discussions, practical exercises and simulation, and written essays.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS556 Command

The course uses lectures, case studies, and small group discussions to explore the theory of command, the command environment, decision making, negotiating, and legal constraints in order to enhance students' overall capacity to command. Participants apply tools to resolve command challenges, and subject matter experts provide evaluation and feedback based on experience and published research. Assessment is by participation in seminars and discussions, practical exercises and simulation, and a written essay.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS557 Institutional Policy Analysis

This course provides an understanding of the methods used in the development of Defence programmes and policies through examination of the multiple perspectives that must be considered by those working at the institutional level within Defence. The theories and analytical methods addressed will draw on the domains of public administration, strategic resource management, military capability development, human resource management, futures analyses, and change management with an emphasis on their applicability to Defence and, in particular, the Canadian Forces. These methods will be used to conduct critical analyses of current or draft Defence policies or programmes.

Prerequisites:
DS555
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS567 Global Power and Institutions

This course builds on "DS565: Security and International Affairs" material along with consideration of the national security activities of Canada, the United States, and other key countries and international institutions in order to provide a general analytical view of the global system, its evolution, its basic characteristics, and the strategic implications for international interactions. By applying conceptual and empirical tools, the course develops a more active understanding of the major problems and challenges of the contemporary international system. Assessment is by oral presentations, seminar participation, and an applied case study examining a contemporary challenge from a Canadian perspective.

Prerequisites:
DS565, DS566
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS568 Advanced Topics in International Security Studies

This course applies conceptual and theoretical tools to analyse specific issues, powers, regions, and institutions that form the strategic environment within which Canada's foreign and security policy are conducted. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of the differing views that various stakeholders may hold on a particular issue. The initial portion of this course will examine how international relations theories can be used to analyze the dynamics of specific security topics. The second component will apply a case study methodology to examine selected issues which are currently of importance in the contemporary security context. Assessment will be through seminar participation and a major independent research paper addressing a topic of the student's choice.

Prerequisites:
DS565, DS566
Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS569 International Security and Canadian Foreign Policy

This course analyses domestic and international factors affecting the development of Canada's security policies. The first module (SCO) provides the theoretical foundations for analyzing and understanding state power, strategic studies and international relations. The second module (GLO) examines the existing international structures managing global security-related issues, along with the influence of independent non-governmental organizations and non-state actors, and concludes with an overlook of US security-related policy making. The third module (CNS) introduces a strategy formulation model and examines the Government of Canada security management structure. The fourth module (CGS) looks at the Canadian government system, its political culture and the major players in the context of the national security interests. The fifth module (CNP) covers current Canadian foreign, defense, and international development policies and gives students the opportunity to discuss them in light of the contemporary security environment. The sixth module (CFD) reviews the process by which DND develops its force structure to meet the demands of national policy and the national strategy which flows from that policy. The final module (REG) looks at the evolution of the world's global security management construct, by using a regionalist model applied to specific regions. Assessment is carried out with presentations, class participation, discussions, and the writing of a persuasive essay.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (two terms)
Credit(s):
2

DS571 Canada in the Global Strategic Environment

This course examines Canada's place in the post-Cold War international political, strategic and economic environment. It begins with a review of traditional international relations theories and their applicability in understanding contemporary global affairs. The course then turns to an examination of trends in inter-state relations, the role of non-state actors including international governmental and non-governmental institutions, failed and fragile states as well as clandestine transnational political and religious movements. The course also considers characteristics of national power, their determinants, and the constraints on the use of military power in order to enable participants to distinguish the elements of national power and the impact of the constraints on the formulation of defence policy and military strategy in Canada.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS572 Canadian Governance in Comparative Context

This course examines contemporary political systems comparing their formal institutions and decision making processes. The course covers western, liberal democracies with market economies, newly emerging democratic states, various kinds of authoritarian regimes as well as the differing impact of history, geography, religion and ideology in how governments operate and the place of civil-society in the political process. The course will also assess the impact of differing domestic systems on the conduct of foreign and defence policy for Canada and Canada's allies.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS581 Executive Leadership

This course combines formal presentations, case studies and seminar discussions to enable participants to integrate theories, doctrine and practical experiences of leadership at the strategic level. The course will draw on a primary text and current Canadian Forces leadership manuals to provide the conceptual and doctrinal basis for understanding leadership.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS582 Strategic Resource Management

This course combines formal presentations, case studies and seminar discussions to refine participants understanding of strategic and institutional level resource management including policy formulation and to evaluate the functioning of the resource management system with emphasis on defence. The course will examine a range of financial, material, infrastructure and human resource topics in the context of federal government policies and programmes.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS584 The Role of Culture in Whole-of-Government Approaches

This course is designed to allow senior decision makers, both military and civilian, to study the role of culture in contexts involving Whole-of-Government approaches, at the strategic and operational levels. The course will focus on those theories and concepts of culture that are the most applicable to contexts involving Whole-of-Government approaches, at the strategic and operational levels. The course will also examine the practical dimensions of leading and managing in multicultural contexts. Topics covered include anthropological, sociological and psychological understandings of cultural realities; culture and inter-agency collaboration in domestic and international contexts; and dealing with organizational and ethnic cultural otherness. Assessment is by essay, case study report and participation in seminars and discussions.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS591 The Theory and Practice of High Command

This course is designed to allow senior decision makers, both military and civilian, to study command at the strategic and operational levels. The course will focus on those theories and concepts of command that are most applicable to the strategic and operational levels. The course will also examine the practise of high command in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Topics to be covered include the comprehensive interrelationships at the strategic level as well as interconnections with the operational level; the evolution of the practise of high command throughout the 20th century, particularly the evolution of Canada's high command system since the end of the Cold War.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS592 Comprehensive Operations

This course is designed to examine the concept of integrated operations as it applies in the current and future defence and security environment. The course will focus on the processes involved in the formulation of strategic objectives and the resultant linkages among ends, ways and means, in joint, combined, coalition, alliance and integrated (inter-agency) environments. The course will also examine the impact of modern theories of conflict, concepts and doctrine on these processes and the resultant campaign plans.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS594 Strategic Art

This course is designed to examine military support to national and grand strategy. This course will focus on military support to strategy. The military instrument of power is normally employed for diplomatic purposes as part of a larger strategy. This has led to its use as a means to influence allies, neutral parties or adversaries in the attainment of non-military ends. Phenomena such as strategic coercion, nation building and even peace support operations need to be examined in this light to separate the political logic for engaging in such tasks from the military judgement of how such tasks ought to be conducted. This course will rely on historical and contemporary applications of a number of activities to illustrate the theme of the course

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

DS597 Contemporary Security Studies

This course consists of field research in which participants gather information and make analyses based on the theoretical and practical knowledge gained during the conduct of the six core courses of the NSP. Participants must use this theoretical knowledge as a basis for gathering field data and then conducting a comparative analysis of an issue related to strategic security, leadership and resource management. Using written analyses participants demonstrate their comprehension of the material taught during the core courses as well as their cognitive capacities in gathering and analyzing appropriate data and in presenting their findings in a clear and effective manner. This course consists of approximately 120 hours of field research during which participants visit strategic and operational level organizations and facilities in a variety of world regions.

Seminar:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

PR500 Research Project

The aim of the Individual Research Project is to develop the participants' ability to think critically and communicate effectively in writing. This aim is accomplished by requiring the students to prepare a properly documented, persuasive essay on a topic of military significance over the course of their year at the College. Students pursuing the MDS are required to produce a paper of between 14,000 and 20,000 words in length. Those pursuing either the MA WS or MPA will be required to meet the requirements of their respective programme. Credits: 1 or 2 depending on the degree programme

Credits:
2
 
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